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A mysterious 300-million-year-old iron pot was discovered in Coal.

We recently published a story about an incredible find unearthed deep below at a Russian coal mine near Rostov.

Mr. Kasatkin, a seasoned safety engineer, discovered the tracks of a chariot’s wheels, a chariot that previously crossed the sand when it was still flexible, petrifying and casting into solid rock, sandstone going back over 300 million years.

Mr. Kasatkin’s keen interest in odd treasures had led him to believe that the discovery would be kept concealed from the public eye, and indeed, the shafts where these ostensibly rich discoveries were buried were flooded, making extraction difficult.

Thankfully, strange prints like these aren’t the only curiosities unearthed deep under the earth’s mines.

Workers at the Municipal Electric Plant in Thomas, Oklahoma, shoveling coal in 1912 would make an equally momentous discovery.

A little iron pot would erupt from one of the big lumps of coal they were breaking up in preparation for the furnaces, much to their amazement.

They’d keep the pot and the lump of coal that had served as its burial for an eternity, obviously perplexed by the pot’s unexpected emergence in reality.

Over the following three days, several specialists would inspect the iron pot, concluding that it was genuine. The imprint of the pot could still be visible in the millions of years of coal fragments that had covered it.

The Wilburton mines coal, where the pot was located, is 312 million years old, according to Robert O. Fay of the Oklahoma Geological Survey.

On January 10, 1949, Robert Nordling, emeritus professor of biology at Andrews University in Berrien Springs, submitted a copy of the cup to Frank Lewis Marsh, emeritus professor of biology at Andrews University in Berrien Springs. In 1971, he mailed the images to Wilbert H Rusc.

Rusch was a founder member and President of the Creation Research Society, as well as a biology professor at Concordia College. Even though the pots had been discovered for some years.

Several attempts have been made to refute its truthfulness; nevertheless, many of these individuals, in addition to their explanations, ignore or fail to acknowledge the existence of a certificate of authenticity, a document that verifies the narrative as factual.

We currently have some artefacts in our hands that are over 300 million years old, according to revised estimations of coal’s age. The pot is still in the hands of a private collector who wishes to remain nameless.

Several attempts have been made to refute its truthfulness; nevertheless, many of these individuals, in addition to their explanations, ignore or fail to acknowledge the existence of a certificate of authenticity, a document that verifies the narrative as factual.

We currently have some artefacts in our hands that are over 300 million years old, according to revised estimations of coal’s age. The pot is still in the hands of a private collector who wishes to remain nameless.

Ermal Shala

Thank you for coming to The Ancientzen. My name is Ermal Shala, and I'm glad to have you here with us today. It's a dream come true for me to be able to research and write about history all day long.

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